Its about user experience: Android users switching to iPhone

PC Mag held an interesting survey surrounding the question: Why did you switch platforms (between iOS and Android)? There are countless discussions of people passionately defending one platform over the other and while we sometimes do hear about those who switch and don’t look back, this survey gives us an insight into the reasoning behind users’ switch to the other platform.

According to Mobile-Review, the Russian blog that has delivered an extensive Pixel 3 XL review well before the phone launched, the Pixel 3 will cost $649, while the Pixel 3 XL will be just $100 more expensive

Comparatively, 2018 iPhones are expected to start at $699 (6.1-inch LCD model), $899 (iPhone X successor), and $999 (“iPhone X Plus”). The Galaxy Note 9 starts at $999 and the Mate 20 Pro will also cost a pretty penny when it launches later this year.

In my opinion all features added on pixel 3xl are already adopted by iPhone in 2018 and the cost of pixel 3xl is too high.

In India, users want best features at less price (Chinese are providing this all) . Xiaomi’s new Pocophone F1, Oneplus are the best example of that. If Indian user have a choice to buy  Pixel 3XL costing around Rs. 78990 & iPhone x costing around 86,900 user will go for iPhone X.

 

 

T-Mobile, Sprint agree to merge

T-Mobile, Sprint agree to merge

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Sprint and T-Mobile announced on Sunday that they had reached a deal to merge, moving to create a new telecommunications giant — and betting that regulators will finally allow the American wireless market to shrink to just three national players.

T-Mobile and Sprint are combining in a deal that would create a bigger No. 3 cellular carrier in the U.S., but could also signal the end of an era of aggressive competition for customers.

The merger, in an all-stock deal announced Sunday after years of on-again-off-again courting, would create a company using the name T-Mobile. It would value Sprint at $59 billion and the combined companies at $146 billion, including debt. Excluding debt, the deal would value Sprint at about $26 billion.

Sprint and T-Mobile have tried unsuccessfully to merge before. They were effectively blocked four years ago by regulators in the Obama administration who worried that shrinking the market for wireless providers would give consumers fewer choices and lead to higher prices.

T-Mobile and Sprint say their merger, if approved by regulators, would mean lower customer prices, greater innovation, more jobs and better wireless service, especially in the rural U.S. They also tout the deal as a way to best position the companies to compete in the forthcoming 5G race for faster mobile Internet. But critics worry that the merger will curb competition and results in job losses.