Cloud computing basic fundamentals

Cloud computing basic fundamentals
What is cloud computing?
cloud computing entails running computer/network applications that are on other people’s servers using a simple user interface or application format. Read more aboutCloud computing basic fundamentals.

Computers in the cloud are configured to work together and the various applications use the collective computing power as if they are running on a single system.
The flexibility of cloud computing is a function of the allocation of resources on demand. This facilitates the use of the system’s cumulative resources, negating the need to assign specific hardware to a task. Before cloud computing, websites and server-based applications were executed on a specific system.
With the advent of cloud computing, resources are used as an aggregated virtual computer. This amalgamated configuration provides an environment where applications execute independently without regard for any particular configuration.
Why the traffic to the cloud?
There are valid and significant business and IT reasons for the cloud computing paradigm shift. The fundamentals of outsourcing as a solution apply.
Reduced cost: Cloud computing can reduce both capital expense (CapEx) and operating expense (OpEx) costs because resources are only acquired when needed and are only paid for when used.
Robust scalability: Cloud computing allows for immediate scaling, either up or down, at any time without long-term commitment.
Cloud computing building blocks
The cloud computing model is comprised of a front end and a back end.
These two elements are connected through a network, in most cases the Internet. The front end is the vehicle by which the user interacts with the system; the back end is the cloud itself.
The front end is composed of a client computer, or the computer network of an enterprise, and the applications used to access the cloud. The back end provides the applications, computers, servers, and data storage that creates the cloud of services.
IT roles in the cloud
Let us consider the probability that management and administration will require greater automation, requiring a change in the tasks of personnel responsible for scripting due to the growth in code production.
You see, IT may be consolidating, with a need for less hardware and software implementation, but it is also creating new formations. The shift in IT is toward the knowledge worker. In the new paradigm, the technical human assets will have greater responsibilities for enhancing and upgrading general business processes.
The developer
The growing use of mobile devices, the popularity of social networking, and other aspects of the evolution of commercial IT processes and systems, will guarantee work for the developer community; however, some of the traditional roles of development personnel will be shifted away from the enterprise’s developers due to the systemic and systematic processes of the cloud configuration model.
Cloud formations
There are three types of cloud formations:
Public clouds are available to the general public or a large industry group and are owned and provisioned by an organization selling cloud services. A public cloud is what is thought of as the cloud in the usual sense; that is, resources dynamically provisioned over the Internet using web applications from an off-site third-party provider that supplies shared resources and bills on a utility computing basis.
Private clouds exist within your company’s firewall and are managed by your organization. They are cloud services you create and control within your enterprise. Private clouds offer many of the same benefits as the public clouds — the major distinction being that your organization is in charge of setting up and maintaining the cloud.

Snowflake offers Microsoft Azure cloud computing

Snowflake offers Microsoft Azure cloud computing

Snowflake Computing Inc., a San Mateo-based company, announced the availability of its data warehousing platform on Microsoft Azure.

About snowflakes

Snowflake Computing is one of the first few companies to realize the potential of building a native, cloud-based data warehouse. Founded in 2012, this company exploited the capabilities of the cloud to design a SQL data warehouse from the ground up. Snowflake’s data platform turned all the knobs available in the cloud to extract the best performance. Within a short span, it started to pose a threat to traditional data warehousing companies.

According to varadrajan snowflakes and Azure deliver the scale and performance we need to enable modern data analytics so we can deliver our customers the product and consumer insights they need.We look forward to what’s on the horizon with Azure and Snowflake.

Snowflake is now bringing its cloud-ready data warehouse to Microsoft Azure. It mapped all the layers of its stack running on AWS to Azure.

The data warehousing platform uses Azure Storage and Blobs to store raw data. The unstructured and semi-structured data can also be ingested via Azure Data Lake.

The compute layer takes advantage of the beefy virtual machines on Azure that deliver the horsepower required for processing. Microsoft customers can use Power BI Desktop for visualizing the results from Snowflake.

Bob Muglia, Snowflake CEO, commented that Organisations continue to move their data analytics to the cloud at an increasing pace, with the cloud data warehouse at the core of their strategy.

Customer demand for an Azure-based data warehouse is also on the rise. We’re working with Microsoft to provide the performance, concurrency and flexibility that Azure customers require from a modern, cloud-built data warehouse.

Corporate Vice President for Azure Compute at Microsoft Corp., Corey Sanders added: “Migration of an enterprise data warehouse into the cloud is a key requirement for Azure customers.

We look forward to partnering with Snowflake to enable these data warehouse migrations for enterprise customers moving onto Microsoft Azure. We are pleased to welcome Snowflake to the Azure platform.